Youth Protection

Protecting Youth is our Top Priority

Over many years, the BSA has developed some of the strongest expert-informed youth protection policies found in any youth-serving organization including mandatory criminal background checks for all leaders, required training in Youth Protection, mandatory reporting, and two-deep leadership.

Every instance of suspected abuse is reported to law enforcement.

Training

The Boy Scouts of America places the greatest importance on creating the most secure environment possible for our youth members.

  • Youth Protection Training is required for all registered volunteers.

  • New leaders are required to take Youth Protection Training before their application will be submitted. The certificate of completion for this training must be submitted at the time application is submitted for processing to be a registered volunteer leader.

  • Youth Protection Training must be taken every two years. If a volunteer’s Youth Protection Training record is not current at the time of recharter, the volunteer will not be reregistered.

The Atlanta Area Council is 100% committed to keeping youth safe and we appreciate the commitment of all 9,000 of our volunteer leaders to make this happen.

Youth Protection Training is designed to help you keep our youth safe from abuse. You will learn the Boy Scouts of America’s Youth Protection Guidelines, signs of abuse, and how to report suspected abuse. After each section of material, you will answer questions about that section’s topic. Click here for more information.

To maintain a safe environment, the BSA developed numerous procedural and leadership selection policies and provides parents and leaders with resources for the Cub ScoutScouts BSA, and Venturing programs.

Get Trained Today

To take Youth Protection Training, go to My.Scouting.org and create an account. From the My.Scouting portal, click on “New to Scouting?  Take training here” and Youth Protection icon in the upper right. Select “Youth Protection Training” from the training menu. Upon completion, you may print a certificate of completion to submit with a volunteer application or submit the completion certificate to the unit leader for processing at the Atlanta Area Council.

Barriers to Abuse

Two registered adult leaders 21 years of age or over are required at all Scouting activities, including meetings. There must be a registered female adult leader 21 years of age or over in every unit serving females. A registered female adult leader 21 years of age or over must be present for any activity involving female youth. Notwithstanding the minimum leader requirements, age- and program-appropriate supervision must always be provided. (Youth Protection and Barriers to Abuse FAQs)

All adults accompanying a Scouting unit who are present at the activity for 72 total hours or more must be registered as leaders. The 72 hours need not be consecutive.

One-on-one contact between adult leaders and youth members is prohibited both inside and outside of Scouting. (Youth Protection and Barriers to Abuse FAQs)

  • In situations requiring a personal conference, the meeting is to be conducted with the knowledge and in view of other adults and/or youth.
  • Private online communications (texting, phone calls, chat, IM, etc.) must include another registered leader or parent.
  • Communication by way of social media (Facebook, Snapchat, etc.) must include another registered leader or parent.

Adult leaders and youth members have a responsibility to recognize, respond to and report Youth Protection violations and abuse.

Youth Protection Policy Violations 

  • Serious Youth Protection policy violations or behaviors that put a youth’s safety at risk must be reported to the Scout executive.
  • Alternatively, policy violations may be reported to the Scouts First Helpline when the Scout executive is not available.
  • Online reporting is also available at Incident Reporting.

Mandatory Reporting of Child Abuse

  • All persons participating in Scouting programs are mandated reporters of child abuse.
  • Reports must be made to local law enforcement and child protective services. State law may require additional reporting.
  • This reporting duty cannot be delegated to any other person.
  • Reporting to the Scout executive or Scouts First Helpline ensures that follow-up can occur for the safety of our youth. Scout executives and Scouts First coordinate follow-up actions.

Scouts First Helpline

As part of its “Scouts First” approach to the protection and safety of youth, the BSA has established a dedicated 24-hour helpline to receive reports of known or suspected abuse or behavior that might put a youth at risk.

1-844-SCOUTS1 (1-844-726-8871)

When to use it:

  • Anytime you believe a youth has been harmed or their safety and wellbeing is at risk, and you cannot immediately reach your Scout executive or local council.
  • If a youth is bullied because of race, color, national origin, religion, sexual orientation, or disability, and local help is unable to resolve the problem.

If someone is at immediate risk of harm, always call 911.

BSA Incident Reporting Resources: Incident Reporting

  • The buddy system should be used.
  • The use of smartphones, cameras, mirrors, drones, etc., in places or situations where privacy is expected is prohibited.
  • All aspects of the Scouting program are open to observation by parents and leaders.
  • The BSA does not recognize any secret organizations as part of its program.
  • Hazing and initiations are prohibited and have no part during any Scouting activity.
  • All forms of bullying and harassment including verbal, physical, and cyberbullying are prohibited.
  • Inappropriate public displays of affection are prohibited.
  • Sexual activity is prohibited.
  • Appropriate attire is required for all activities.

Discipline must be constructive.

  • Discipline must reflect Scouting’s values.
  • Corporal punishment is never permitted.
  • Disciplinary activities involving isolation, humiliation, or ridicule are also prohibited.

Separate accommodations for adult males and females and youth males and females are required.

Tenting

  • Separate tenting arrangements must be provided for male and female adults as well as for male and female youth.
  • Youth sharing tents must be no more than two years apart in age.
  • In Cub Scouting, parents and guardians may share a tent with their family.
  • In all other programs, youth and adults tent separately. (Youth Protection and Barriers to Abuse FAQs)
  • Spouses may share tents.

Lodging/Cabin Accommodations

Whenever possible, separate cabins or lodging should be provided for male and female adults as well as for male and female youth. Where separate accommodations cannot be provided due to group size or limited availability, modifications may be made. Where completely separate accommodations are not available, additional supervision is required. (Youth Protection and Barriers to Abuse FAQs)

  • If adults and youth of the same gender occupy single-room accommodations, there must be a minimum of two adults and four youth, with all adults being Youth Protection trained.
  • Physical separation by other means, including temporary barriers or space, should be used only when no other arrangements are possible.
  • These modifications are limited to single-gender accommodations.

Restrooms

Separate shower and latrine facilities should be provided for male and female adults as well as for male and female youth. If separate facilities are not available, separate times should be scheduled and posted.

Privacy of youth is respected.

  • Adults and youth must respect each other’s privacy, especially in situations such as changing clothes and taking showers at camp.
  • Adult leaders should closely monitor these areas but only enter as needed for youth protection or health and safety reasons.

Youth Protection Team

Jason Baldridge

Jason Baldridge

Director of Safe Scouting & Support

(770) 956-3173

Joshua Kirkham

Joshua Kirkham

Safe Scouting & Operations Director

(770) 989-2898